The Caucasus and the American-Iranian Nuclear Deal

The Caucasus and the American-Iranian Nuclear Deal

April 2, 2014

<p class="font_8" style=""><span class="color_2"><span style="">Since he was elected president of Iran in June 2013, Hassan Rouhani has been striving to say the right things in order to convince the international community that Tehran is changing course. Within a few months of coming to power, he dispatched his foreign minister Javad Zarif to Geneva, where in November the Iranians managed to seal an interim but still important compromise deal about Iran’s nuclear program. The world is now eagerly watching to see if more compromises can be reached with </span><span style="">Tehran,</span><span style=""> and if a permanent nuclear settlement can be expanded to incorporate other contentious issues that have long divided Iran from the West and from many of its immediate </span><span style="">neighbours</span><span style="">. Among those </span><span style="">neighbours</span><span style=""> are the South Caucasus states.&nbsp;</span></span></p>

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The Caucasus and the American-Iranian Nuclear Deal

The Caucasus and the American-Iranian Nuclear Deal

April 2, 2014

<p class="font_8" style=""><span class="color_2"><span style="">Since he was elected president of Iran in June 2013, Hassan Rouhani has been striving to say the right things in order to convince the international community that Tehran is changing course. Within a few months of coming to power, he dispatched his foreign minister Javad Zarif to Geneva, where in November the Iranians managed to seal an interim but still important compromise deal about Iran’s nuclear program. The world is now eagerly watching to see if more compromises can be reached with </span><span style="">Tehran,</span><span style=""> and if a permanent nuclear settlement can be expanded to incorporate other contentious issues that have long divided Iran from the West and from many of its immediate </span><span style="">neighbours</span><span style="">. Among those </span><span style="">neighbours</span><span style=""> are the South Caucasus states.&nbsp;</span></span></p>

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The Caucasus and the American-Iranian Nuclear Deal

The Caucasus and the American-Iranian Nuclear Deal

April 2, 2014

<p class="font_8" style=""><span class="color_2"><span style="">Since he was elected president of Iran in June 2013, Hassan Rouhani has been striving to say the right things in order to convince the international community that Tehran is changing course. Within a few months of coming to power, he dispatched his foreign minister Javad Zarif to Geneva, where in November the Iranians managed to seal an interim but still important compromise deal about Iran’s nuclear program. The world is now eagerly watching to see if more compromises can be reached with </span><span style="">Tehran,</span><span style=""> and if a permanent nuclear settlement can be expanded to incorporate other contentious issues that have long divided Iran from the West and from many of its immediate </span><span style="">neighbours</span><span style="">. Among those </span><span style="">neighbours</span><span style=""> are the South Caucasus states.&nbsp;</span></span></p>

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The Caucasus and the American-Iranian Nuclear Deal

The Caucasus and the American-Iranian Nuclear Deal

April 2, 2014

<p class="font_8" style=""><span class="color_2"><span style="">Since he was elected president of Iran in June 2013, Hassan Rouhani has been striving to say the right things in order to convince the international community that Tehran is changing course. Within a few months of coming to power, he dispatched his foreign minister Javad Zarif to Geneva, where in November the Iranians managed to seal an interim but still important compromise deal about Iran’s nuclear program. The world is now eagerly watching to see if more compromises can be reached with </span><span style="">Tehran,</span><span style=""> and if a permanent nuclear settlement can be expanded to incorporate other contentious issues that have long divided Iran from the West and from many of its immediate </span><span style="">neighbours</span><span style="">. Among those </span><span style="">neighbours</span><span style=""> are the South Caucasus states.&nbsp;</span></span></p>

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