Russian Bombers in Iran and Tehran's Internal Power Struggle

Russian Bombers in Iran and Tehran's Internal Power Struggle

August 17, 2016

<p class="font_8" style=""><span style="">For the first time since 1979, Iran has given a foreign power the right to conduct military operations from its soil. Russia is now&nbsp;<span style=""><a dataquery="#textLink_iryuhefl">operating</a></span>&nbsp;<span style=""><a dataquery="#textLink_iryuhefl1">Tu-22M3 long-range bombers</a></span>&nbsp;from an Iranian airbase. The purported goal is only limited to joint Iranian-Russian operations against anti-Assad rebels inside Syria. But while an Iranian-Russian partnership to keep President Bashar al-Assad alive has been in place as long as the Syrian war has raged, this latest upswing in military collaboration might be a prelude to a greater strategic pivot. It can have far-reaching consequences not only impacting Iranian and Russian foreign </span><span style="">policies,</span><span style=""> but also American interests in the broader Middle East. This newfound Iranian-Russian tie-up, however, is not new, nor should its latest blossoming come as a surprise.</span></p>

Russian Bombers in Iran and Tehran's Internal Power Struggle

Russian Bombers in Iran and Tehran's Internal Power Struggle

August 17, 2016

<p class="font_8" style=""><span style="">For the first time since 1979, Iran has given a foreign power the right to conduct military operations from its soil. Russia is now&nbsp;<span style=""><a dataquery="#textLink_iryuhefl">operating</a></span>&nbsp;<span style=""><a dataquery="#textLink_iryuhefl1">Tu-22M3 long-range bombers</a></span>&nbsp;from an Iranian airbase. The purported goal is only limited to joint Iranian-Russian operations against anti-Assad rebels inside Syria. But while an Iranian-Russian partnership to keep President Bashar al-Assad alive has been in place as long as the Syrian war has raged, this latest upswing in military collaboration might be a prelude to a greater strategic pivot. It can have far-reaching consequences not only impacting Iranian and Russian foreign </span><span style="">policies,</span><span style=""> but also American interests in the broader Middle East. This newfound Iranian-Russian tie-up, however, is not new, nor should its latest blossoming come as a surprise.</span></p>

Russian Bombers in Iran and Tehran's Internal Power Struggle

Russian Bombers in Iran and Tehran's Internal Power Struggle

August 17, 2016

<p class="font_8" style=""><span style="">For the first time since 1979, Iran has given a foreign power the right to conduct military operations from its soil. Russia is now&nbsp;<span style=""><a dataquery="#textLink_iryuhefl">operating</a></span>&nbsp;<span style=""><a dataquery="#textLink_iryuhefl1">Tu-22M3 long-range bombers</a></span>&nbsp;from an Iranian airbase. The purported goal is only limited to joint Iranian-Russian operations against anti-Assad rebels inside Syria. But while an Iranian-Russian partnership to keep President Bashar al-Assad alive has been in place as long as the Syrian war has raged, this latest upswing in military collaboration might be a prelude to a greater strategic pivot. It can have far-reaching consequences not only impacting Iranian and Russian foreign </span><span style="">policies,</span><span style=""> but also American interests in the broader Middle East. This newfound Iranian-Russian tie-up, however, is not new, nor should its latest blossoming come as a surprise.</span></p>

Russian Bombers in Iran and Tehran's Internal Power Struggle

Russian Bombers in Iran and Tehran's Internal Power Struggle

August 17, 2016

<p class="font_8" style=""><span style="">For the first time since 1979, Iran has given a foreign power the right to conduct military operations from its soil. Russia is now&nbsp;<span style=""><a dataquery="#textLink_iryuhefl">operating</a></span>&nbsp;<span style=""><a dataquery="#textLink_iryuhefl1">Tu-22M3 long-range bombers</a></span>&nbsp;from an Iranian airbase. The purported goal is only limited to joint Iranian-Russian operations against anti-Assad rebels inside Syria. But while an Iranian-Russian partnership to keep President Bashar al-Assad alive has been in place as long as the Syrian war has raged, this latest upswing in military collaboration might be a prelude to a greater strategic pivot. It can have far-reaching consequences not only impacting Iranian and Russian foreign </span><span style="">policies,</span><span style=""> but also American interests in the broader Middle East. This newfound Iranian-Russian tie-up, however, is not new, nor should its latest blossoming come as a surprise.</span></p>